Happy Holi… with Parsad!

Guyanese Parsad

The first time I tried to make this lovely Indian sweet treat, I made it entirely from memory: scent and taste memory. My grandmother was Hindu and we got parsad at almost any Hindu holiday, festival or religious services. I remember the parsad always came in a brown paper bag with 1/2 of a small banana, a piece of water melon and some pomegranate seeds. These garnishes made the parsad even more delectable. I finally narrowed down the proportions for the parsad recipe and wanted to share with you lovely people. Now I must say that I googled Guyanese parsad before posting this and to my surprise the recipes I saw were completely different to mine. Am I making it the right way? Not sure but I remember my grandmother sort of making it this way. If I am wrong and you have a better recipe, don’t be afraid to share. We’re all learning together…

First I prepared the wet ingredients…

Bring 3 cups whole milk to a boil. Add 1/2 tsp of cinnamon powder, 1/4 tsp vanilla essence, 1/2 cup butter, 3/4 cup granulated sugar and 1/4 cup of raisins (not pictured).Once sugar has dissolved reduce to a low heat.

Bring 3 cups whole milk to a boil. Add 1/2 tsp of cinnamon powder, 1/4 tsp vanilla essence, 1/2 cup butter, 3/4 cup granulated sugar and 1/4 cup of raisins (not pictured).
Once sugar  dissolves reduce to a low heat.

Now for the flour…

Add two cups of flour to a large saute/frying pan on medium heat. Constantly turn the flour in the pan with a wooden spoon until the flour is evenly brown. This is called parching the flour.

Add two cups of flour to a large saute/frying pan on medium heat.
Constantly turn the flour in the pan with a wooden spoon until the flour is evenly brown. This is called parching the flour.

Bringing it together…

Add the milk and raisins the flour, once the flour reaches a warm brown color. Stir the flour and milk until the milk is completely mixed with the flour. Reduce heat to low and continue to stir until mixture becomes thick.

Add the milk and raisins the flour, once the flour reaches a warm brown color.
Stir the flour and milk until the milk is completely mixed with the flour. Reduce heat to low and continue to stir until mixture becomes thick.

Smooth out any lumps by using the back of your wooden spoon and pressing and pulling along the bottom of the pan.

Smooth out any lumps by using the back of your wooden spoon and pressing and pulling along the bottom of the pan.

Remove from the heat and enjoy!

Guyanese Parsad

Parsad

Ingredients:
2 cups all purpose flour
3 cups whole milk
3/4 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup butter
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp vanilla extract
1/4 cup raisins

Directions:
Combine milk,sugar,butter, ground cinnamon, vanilla extract and raisins and bring to a boil on medium heat. Once sugar has completely dissolved reduce to low heat. In a sauce/frying pan, on medium heat, parch flour until lightly brown. Add milk and raisins to flour and mix until completely combined. Reduce heat to low and continue stirring mixture until thick and smooth. Remove from heat and enjoy!

Tips and Ramblings:
1. This recipe was created through trial and error.
2. You could add cardamon or other spices to this sweet.
3. If you know a better way to make parsad, please feel free to share.

Happy Cooking!

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

7 thoughts on “Happy Holi… with Parsad!

  1. Gale says:

    Maybe things have changed because I learned like 16 yrs ago. My cousin in law taught me. 1st u parch the flour then sieve it. 2nd melt the butter add the flour while stirring continuously. 3rd add sugar water to mixture (still stirring on fire) 4th add raisins and cherries and milk (optional). Finish lol. But u hv to average the cooking time to make sure its cooked thoroughly.

    • Metemgee says:

      This is how I used to make it. But the butter always made the flour clump up. So then I started putting it in the milk. Other recipes I saw online they add the flour to the pot of boiling milk and let it cook down. When I saw this my main concern was am I cooking this flour long enough? But I’ve made it several times and no one got sick, so…

  2. Anisia says:

    Nice work Althee!!

  3. Karen says:

    Great proportions! Thanks! I made it with soy milk instead of whole milk and it was just as good!!

  4. Jenelle says:

    I use a sieve to sift the parched flour, pressing any lumps with the back of the spoon, then mix the flour into the milk (without the butter). The butte is then melted in the pot on low heat and the flour/milk mixture is added and turned until it forms the same consistency. With this process, no lumps have to be dealt with during the cooking process, and the buttery flavour is more pronounced!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: